NW Boychoir features Madrona students

The NW Boychoir.  Photo: Ben VanHouten

The Northwest Boychoir proudly presents its 39th annual A Festival of Lessons & Carols concert series, featuring eight regional performances in December. These holiday concerts showcase the 90-member combined chorus of the Northwest Boychoir and Vocalpoint! Seattle.

Three members of the Northwest Boychoir live in or near Madrona:
Gabriel Sharp, 14 (8th grader at The Northwest School)
Xander Uyttendaele, 16 (11th grader at Lakeside School)
Leo Winkler, 12 (6th grader at The Northwest School)

Photo: Ben VanHouten

Patterned after the Christmas Eve observance at King’s College in Cambridge, England, A Festival of Lessons & Carols has become a holiday tradition for thousands of families in the Puget Sound region. This classical performance consists of nine holiday readings, each followed by a traditional carol performed by the choir, and another carol sung by the choir and audience.

A Festival of Lessons & Carols concerts are open to the public, and will run December 9-22, 2017 at various venues throughout the Puget Sound Region. Concerts have reserved seating.

For Advanced Tickets and More Information: http://www.nwboychoir.org or (206) 524-3234. These concerts often draw sold-out audiences. Advance ticket purchases are encouraged.

Maria Johnson, Executive Director
Joseph Crnko, Music Director

Sat. Dec. 9, 7:30 pm
Trinity Lutheran Church
6215 196th Street SW, Lynnwood
Reserved seating

Sun. Dec. 10, 7:00 pm
Emmanuel Episcopal Church
4400 86th Ave SE, Mercer Island
Reserved seating

Sat. Dec. 16, 7:30 pm
Saint Mark’s Cathedral
1245 10th Avenue East, Seattle
Reserved seating

Sun. Dec. 17, 7:00 pm
Holy Rosary Church
4210 SW Genesee Street, Seattle
Reserved seating

Tues. Dec. 19, 7:30 pm
Saint Mark’s Cathedral
1245 10th Avenue East, Seattle
Reserved seating

Wed. Dec. 20, 7:30 pm
Saint Mark’s Cathedral
1245 10th Avenue East, Seattle
Reserved seating

Thurs. Dec. 21, 7:30 pm
St. Alphonsus Church
5816 15th Avenue NW, Seattle
Reserved seating

Special Event
Friday, Dec. 22, 7:30 pm
Benaroya Hall
S. Mark Taper Foundation Auditorium
Presented by the Seattle Symphony with Northwest Sinfonia
200 University Street, Seattle
Reserved seating
Tickets through Seattle Symphony:
206.215.4747 or http://www.seattlesymphony.org

Luna in the Laundromat

If you’re in the mood for quality, locally-made ice cream, look no further than the Madrona Laundromat. That’s right, Molly Moon’s has a walk-up window tucked inside (which you may already be aware of) for the past 6 years. Whether you want to treat yourself while watching your spin cycle, or prefer to stop in purely for their creamy, homemade sweet, Molly Moon’s is worth the trip.

Recently, we spoke with Emily in Molly Moon’s Marketing and Community Relations department to find out more about their business:

Question:  Besides the awesome & unique fact your business is located inside a laundromat, what other things make your Madrona shop different from the other locations?
Answer:  Madrona is smaller than other locations, so it does not have a kitchen, we get our ice cream from our Capitol Hill shop! Because we’re so small, it really, truly feels like a neighborhood shop!  Fun fact: Our Madrona shop is the only shop in the company that does a praline cookie ice cream sammie, and it is AMAZING!

Q:  How often do your featured flavors of ice cream change over? A certain day of the month?
A:  We change our seasonal flavors each month, we usually have one or two rotating vegan flavors, one is usually a sorbet. And then we have two seasonal ice cream flavors. Our chefs try to come up with flavors using seasonal organic, and Washington-grown ingredients!

Q:  Who masterminds and creates your ice cream? Is it done on-location at one of the ice cream shops, or is produced somewhere separately in another building?
A:  Each one of our shops, except Madrona and 19th and Mercer has its own Kitchen Manager, our Kitchen Managers are trained culinary professionals, most of them have culinary degrees. Our culinary manager works with them to assign research and development work for flavors, and they each get to create their own. Molly guides them, and of course, makes the final decisions!

Q:  What do you like about your customers? Who are your customers? (Those doing laundry? People who come in specifically to buy ice cream only? Mostly folks from Madrona or elsewhere?)
A:  Madrona customers it seems are truly people that live around the neighborhood. We love them!

Q:  What encouraged the owner Molly to start an ice cream business?
A:  Molly worked at an ice cream shop in college, she then worked at a non-profit, and later decided to start Molly Moon’s, to use her experience to start a company where she could put all of her progressive values into practice, and also prove she could still be profitable after doing that! She made sure when starting Molly Moon’s that she paid above minimum wage, paid 100% of her employee’s health care premiums, offered paid family leave and only used compostable products! To this day, she still ensures these benefits, but has added many more!

If you have ever wondered why their shops are called “Molly Moon’s”, owner Molly Neitzel’s actual middle name is Moon. Days that the Madrona shop (1408 34th Ave.) are open vary according to the seasons. At this time of year, they are open from 2-10 pm. Their phone # (in case you want to check ahead) is (206) 324-0753.

Enjoy the Luna (Moon) in the laundromat!

All That Glitters

The 34th annual Glitter Sale at the large Goodwill store, 1400 South Lane Street (Seattle), is fast approaching! If you’ve never attended before, come prepared to be dazzled (and possibly a little frazzled, because of the sheer number of attendees) on November 11th and 12th from 9 am- 6 pm. Since the waiting lines to the few fitting rooms are long, it’s best to come prepared by wearing clothing in which you can try things on over the top, right in the aisles, such as tank tops, body suits, and thinner leggings/pants. You still have the option of waiting for the fitting rooms, but the afore mentioned does save time. The glittery or glamorous finds on sale include formal dresses and suits, pants, tops, shoes, coats, hats, jewelry, and many other items.

Last year, this 2-day event brought in a record $310,000 towards free job training and education for those in need. Goodwill placed 1,918 people in jobs last year through their programs.

There will also be a Glitter Sale Preview event on November 8th from 4 pm-8 pm at $50 to $125 per ticket. The advantage is being able to view the collection before the general populous sees it at the official sale three days later. Click here for a sneak peak at a few of the items that will be offered.

So when you’re trying on that vintage hat or buying that sequined outfit, you can feel good about contributing toward a good cause. With the number of people’s lives that are improved by Goodwill’s programs and this sale, all that glitters really is gold.

Central Affordable Housing & Business Development

A year ago, Vulcan Real Estate bought six acres at 23rd Avenue South and South Jackson Street for $30.9 million in the Central District of Seattle. Five years earlier, another realty company, which sold to Vulcan, paid $12.5 million less. Currently, a Red Apple grocery store sits on this site, which will be replaced with two 7-story buildings separated by a public walkway and an additional one-level retail space. The first floor on the two, larger buildings will be for retail, with 530 apartments above and a multi-tiered 500+ parking garage below.

Renderings of Future Vulcan Building. Image: Vulcan Real Estate and Studio 216

Increased gentrification of our city has some concerned, and the Central District area is no exception. In the 1960s, this neighborhood was 70% African-American, according to a Seattle Times article; a year ago, it was down to 20%. In part due to sharply rising housing costs, there has been a call for more affordable housing in the Central District, and keeping or attracting African-American-owned businesses to the neighborhood. Concerning affordable housing, one-fifth of Vulcan’s new site will include rental units offered at a reduced amount (65-85% median income), which in turn provides Vulcan with a tax credit.

Other Central District plans are underway to increase affordable housing and business opportunities farther north along 23rd Avenue South as well. The Midtown Center at 23rd and East Union Street was purchased by a partnership for a combination of profit, retaining some of the center’s current character, and to build 125 affordable living units within the 500-unit complex. This developer might also receive a tax credit, not unlike Vulcan, and be able to build more floors on the building. And the former Liberty Bank location at nearby 24th and Union will be the site for a new 6-story, mixed-use building with up to 115 affordable housing units and commercial spaces that focus on attracting local business, especially African-American.

The Market’s Open!

The seasonal Madrona Farmers Market opened recently on May 19th! Because of our unusually long rainy season this year in WA State (the longest on record in modern history), some of the farm vendors understandably had a delay with their crops. But our warm season is firmly underway now, as are abundant produce, herbs, and artisanal goods!  Look at this chart to see what’s approximately available. (Keep in mind there might be a lag, due to previous rain).

Recently, Seattle was rated 4th in the nation for being the most fit city. One of the reasons cited for this improvement was the increase in the number of farmers markets in our area: a positive indication that unprocessed, natural food can make a difference in one’s health.

If you would like to visit other farmers markets in other neighborhoods as well, here is a complete list of places and hours from The Seattle Times. The Madrona Farmers Market is on Fridays, from 3-7 pm through the end of September. Bon appetit!